Join our 4 days training course in Participatory Video and Most Significant Change (PVMSC) on 11-14 September 2017, organized by ResultsinHealth Netherlands (RiH), RIH Indonesia, and Circle Indonesia. You will learn all about this participatory evaluation technique, while enjoying the beautiful Bali!

From 3 to 5 October, ResultsinHealth organised a 3-day training on the “Participatory Video/Most Significant Change” (PVMSC) technique in The Hague, the Netherlands. PVMSC is one of several new and exciting participatory Monitoring and Evaluation methods. Most Significant Change (MSC) expert Nur Hidayati and Participatory Video (PV) trainer Tessa Steenbergen facilitated this successful training.

ResultsinHealth has been asked to provide essential input on assessing the effectiveness and efficiency of two peer support projects for HIV positive migrants in the Netherlands. This support will feed into the design of a new multi-year anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence programme.

ResultsinHealth is thrilled to announce that 'Evaluations that Make a Difference 2015' has been published recently by EvalPartners, a consortium of international evaluation expert agencies from around the world, and supported by the African Development Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank.

In late 2015, ResultsinHealth was asked to support the Indonesian Forests and Climate Change Programme (FORCLIME) in monitoring its activities on Kalimantan (Borneo) island. FORCLIME focusses on strengthening sustainable forest management and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+).

To get an impression of a recent Most Significant Change (MSC) training held by ResultsinHealth in Indonesia, the dynamics of the course, the expectations and appreciation of the participants, and possible application areas for the MSC methodology, take a look at our movie.

Recently, ResultsinHealth had its website redesigned to make it well readable on all screens, since websites are increasingly viewed on mobile devices (tablets and smartphones). Sites that were originally designed for large screens (laptops or desktop computers), may not be pleasant to view on mobile devices, as their screens are smaller.

In January and February of this year, ResultsinHealth applied the Most Significant Change (MSC) technique in research in Indonesia, in an effort to document changes in lives of poor people who benefitted from a national poverty reduction programme.

From 17 to 21 November, ResultsinHealth organised three trainings in Jakarta, Indonesia: a two-day training in the Most Significant Change (MSC) Technique, a one-day MSC Database Course, and a two-day Qualitative Analysis Workshop. The last two trainings were facilitated in collaboration with Fiona Kotvojs of Kurrajong Hills Pty Ltd.

ResultsinHealth recently presented in two European conferences: The 2014 congress of the European branch of the International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections (IUSTI Europe) in Malta, and the 11th Biennial Conference of the European Evaluation Society (EES Conference) in Dublin, Ireland.